The Difference Between a Pinwheel and a Dog

Flashback with me: squiggly lines, squiggly lines, squiggly lines. We’re at the Denver Mini Maker Faire in early May, 2014. The National Western Complex is busy with inquisitive children, adults, childlike adults and even a couple childish adults all buzzing with the excitement of various hands-on activities and demonstrations. MakerBoulder.com had a booth at the Faire — it was one of our first incarnations. And in addition to a Makey Makey and a couple other jazz-hands attention grabbers, we had selected an engaging little craft: a clever pinwheel made out of simple straws, tape and some soft wire.

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Study Shows How Kids Learn to Conform

For the most part, 4-year-olds don’t care a whole lot about social norms. But then 9-year-olds do. An article published in the journal Child Development looks at what happens between these two ages: how do kids become aware of the norms that bind us and eventually them? Knowing the answer can help us help our kids avoid it.

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Multitasking and the Curious Phenomenon of “Supertasking”

I don’t multitask. Or, I do it so badly that I end up dropping everything in a massive tangle of badness with me standing baffled at its center. This frustrates my wife to no end. She can balance on a beach ball while writing things in her calendar, listening to Radio Lab, text-messaging, and juggling chainsaws (it’s a neat trick — and also kind of hot). I hold that monotasking allows me to get a string of things done right, one at a time. Kristi thinks that multitasking is a prerequisite for inclusion in post-Stone Age society and that monotaskers should be rounded up and reprogrammed at underground government facilities.

The question is, is there hope for us monotaskers? Should monotaskers like me strive for less inept sessions of multitasking, or should we just give it up completely?

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