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1. Provide materials that foster creativity. 2. Emphasize that there is no “right” way to create something. 3. Provide scaffolding for children in their creative processes. 4. Teach children to view setbacks as a opportunities to learn rather than as failures, and encourage them to embrace an attitude of experimentation. 5. Praise the effort children put forth in the creative process, not their innate abilities.
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Bucket full in the first three houses? Or lugging around a massive, empty bucket? Oh the Halloween horror! Here's how to get the bucket volume exactly right.
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Rather than tell your children that they are creative, artistic, or smart when they are engaging in the creative process, praise them for working hard, experimenting with new strategies, and persevering through difficulties.
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Join Maker Boulder to sew plushies for charity with Monsters to Love, Saturday, October 18 3-5p at Mackintosh Academy (preregistration suggested)!
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When a project falls apart, gets knocked down, or is in some way unsatisfactory to a child, model a positive view of setbacks by encouraging children to think about what they can learn from it
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Once children have an idea in mind of something they want to create, resist the urge to tell them how to do it, even if they ask. Instead, give them just enough assistance to help them progress, while still fostering their independence.
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Woohoo! It's the Boulder Cardboard Challenge, baby! Come help us rip into a truly massive pile of cardboard at Horizons K-8 on Sat from 10a-2p.
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As adults, we often take a “teacher-learner” approach with children; we teach, they learn, and we tell them when they’re doing something right or wrong. When it comes to innovation, use a “learner-learner” approach.
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My house is filled with trash. Not because I’m a terrible housekeeper, or because my husband shirks his weekly duty of taking it out, but because my children love making projects out of garbage, recycling, and anything else they find compelling.